THE EARTH

THE NATURAL EARTH

- Chapter 21 -
The effect of light upon the air


 
T
he origin of these specifica (these are the unseen sources of all matter and substance corresponding to their kind. -ED.), their coming into being, their existence and cessation, have, like each and every thing, a necessary reason.
 
 
Look up and see how countless stars glitter in the distant space of the infinite ether. Human beings are captivated when the gleam of millions of stars falls into their eyes. That is the effect of the light from these distant regions. It is the light that causes the atmospheric air to form this great eye around the celestial bodies. It is also only the light that forms the eye in a human being, and thus the eye and the light are related, for if the eye were not a light it would not be able to see the light.
 
 
When a human being, with his eye, with this little sun in his body, views the starry heavens, his eye becomes a little shell-globe itself, in which millions of suns orbit and central suns cast their primordial light into infinite space. An entire infinite creation is thus carried by the eye of a human being. The sun, emitting rays and reflecting them in the sun-related eye of a human being, causes a blissful sensitivity in the soul regarding such miracles, showing how the greatest may be found again in the smallest, and recognize itself for what it is in itself.
 
 
And the Lord speaks: When the light of the stars through the eye of a human being brings forth such a great effect, albeit on a greatly reduced scale, then how much greater is the effect of the starlight through the great earth-eye upon the Earth herself! Because the atmospheric air is a brilliant mirror on her surface, upon which the ether rests, and upon which every star is reflected in a considerable size. From there this picture is projected upon the firm surface of the Earth, and always with concentrated luminous intensity in accordance with well-known optical laws. This concentrated light is a very simple specificum of the atmospheric air, because it affects the corresponding parts in the Earth and upon her surface, either in a dissolving or a condensing manner. Now, count the numerous stars if you can; you will see the immense number of simple specifica in your atmospheric air. Everything that is physically upon and in the Earth is the result of the stars.
 
 
The astronomers have made two really important observations. One of them is that stars existing earlier have completely disappeared. Accordingly, this specificum, which had an effect upon the Earth, must also have disappeared, and, with it, those beings which through this specificum could enter into a physical existence.
 
 
Another discovery of the astronomers is that the light from very distant stellar systems will reach the Earth for the first time now or many years from now. As a result of this, new specifica must come into being on Earth, and therewith new formations. This will have a beneficial or detrimental effect upon the beings a I ready existent in accordance with the attributes of the star from which the specificum comes forth, because there are good and evil stars, and, as a consequence, there are good and evil plants and animals.
 
 
There are also double stars which, at appointed periods of lime, cover each other and make their effect known. Of these stars, one may have a good nature whereas the other may be evil. II the good star lies in front of the evil one it neutralizes its evil effect. When they are side by side and both emit their light, then he influence of the evil star is lessened by the good star. When, however, the evil star is in front of the good star, it eliminates utterly the effect of the good star. When such a star stands at the zenith over a certain part of the Earth, you will soon notice a bad effect there which will make itself known either through bad weather, through deformities of some species of plants, or through ailments of animals and people.
 
 
When planets cover stars, they may also exert their good or bad influence upon the Earth in accordance with their character. This knowledge provided the ancient wise men with the foundation for the "regimen of the planets," which nowadays sounds like a mere fairy-tale. But the idea is not as foolish as the scholars of today believe. Weather prediction has its basis in this kind of observation, and this is also belittled by many. In spite of it all, the ancient wisdom remains true, now as before.
 
 
Comets and other light-emitting meteors exert a noticeable influence upon Earth, even if only for short periods of time. No less effective upon the Earth is the light variation of the moon, and especially noticeable is the periodic variation of the sun's light; and this is proven by the difference between summer and winter, among other things.