THE EARTH

THE NATURAL EARTH

- Chapter 2 -
The heart of the Earth


 
A
s I mentioned before, the center of gravity of the Earth has a structure similar to that of the human heart or the heart of an animal. It is this center of gravity, this Earth heart, which, like the heart in a human being, stands in necessary proportion to the earthly globe and is the loom or workshop of the entire life of the Earth.
 
 
In its many chambers, a mighty energy must be produced in order to drive the many different life fluids of the Earth out to her far-reaching organs and then pull them back to be replenished anew. This leads to the conclusion that the heart of the Earth must be fairly large. Its size, however, cannot be determined exactly, because it must by necessity expand and contract very quickly. On the average, the diameter of the heart of the Earth is approximately 466 miles (750 kilometers). It can expand to 932 miles (1,500 kilometers) or contract to 233 miles (375 kilometers).
 
 
Of what does the so-called heart of the Earth consist? It is not made up so much of matter, as is the heart of an animal or a human being. Rather, it is a substantial power which moves in an effective manner through a permeable, yet otherwise solid, organism, and exerts its effect upon each and every part of the Earth's body.
 
 
If this organism is solid, then how can it be permeated by a substantial power without being damaged thereby?
 
 
The bones of an animal are likewise a solid substance. The fluids and blood are driven through its pores, yet the bones last longer than anything else in the body, even though they are subjected to every possible reaction of this driving power.
 
 
Take, for instance, the substance of the intestines of animals. No matter how often and in what manner this seemingly weak matter is ruthlessly exploited, in spite of all the wear and tear, it continues to operate effectively for a long time. If, furthermore, you examine the much more delicate organs of birds, in which stones are ground up and consumed, it must then become clear that the entire issue depends only upon a certain quality of the matter, by virtue of which it is built solidly enough to let the developed inner powers be active without causing any harm.
 
 
If this delicate matter has such qualifications, then how much more possible is it that such a solid organism may be produced in the Earth out of such matter, especially since, for millions of years, the intensely active forces of the inner Earth have done little or no harm at all to her structure?
 
 
I, the Master of all things, have always found the proper ratio, so that the points of support are sufficiently solid and durable to carry the weight they rest upon with the greatest of ease, and the same principle applies to the organ matter employed so that the substantial heart of the Earth may do its work.
 
 
In the northern regions of the Earth, the metal platinum may frequently be found. This metal is similar to the organ matter that serves the working central power of the Earth, but do not draw the conclusion that this metal is completely identical with that matter. Actually, the interior of the Earth is not of the same composition as the particular matter which forms the surface of the Earth. The insensitive external skin of the Earth relates to the interior of the Earth merely as the skin relates to the flesh and blood of the human body. The inner matter of the Earth is also a kind of flesh, blood, and bones, but it does not entirely resemble the interior of the animalistic body.