THE EARTH

THE NATURAL EARTH

- Chapter 16 -
The material and construction of the firm Earth


 
T
he firm Earth consists of a particular substance which is I most like the wood of a tree and which is uniform throughout. It is, however, somewhat less dense towards the interior; the density increases towards the outside. When we are dealing with immense weights, the stability must also be immense. It wards the interior, however, where the polar forces are active through the viscera of the Earth, the density must decrease and the Earth must be somewhat more durable and yielding so that it does not burst from the immense accumulation of the inner forces, and so that the very sensitive inner organs do not suffer any harm due to a possible impact on a firm wall during their dilations and contractions.
 
 
In her structure, the Earth becomes more solid towards the surface. This solid part has a thickness of approximately 932 miles (1,500 kilometers) and is strong enough to carry the outer crust of the Earth with all her oceans, continents, and mountains quite easily.
 
 
Of what kind of material does this firm Earth consist? It is very difficult to explain this properly, since on the surface of the Earth there is nothing discoverable which resembles it. It is neither rock nor metal, nor diamond nor gold nor platinum. If this substance resembled any of these, it would soon be turned into slag and ashes through the inner fire that escapes the viscera. This substance must also endure the powerful thoroughfare of countless sources of fire and other destructive forces; it would wear out and disintegrate in these parts.
 
 
The material that resembles this substance most closely is asbestos, when this material is found in a firm form, because this stone wool is almost indestructible in a fire, as well as in acids, although it may be dissolved chemically. There is a difference between this chemically indestructible substance of the firm Earth and the stone wool. Even more than stone wool, this substance resembles a certain kind of pumice stone which can only be found in the vicinity of the South Pole. If someone were to succeed in approaching this highly dangerous area, he would have to dig deep through the ice, and he would also have to know where such pumice stone might be found. Because of its brilliant color and indestructibility, one grain (.0648 gram) of this kind of stone would be worth more than 100 pounds of heavy pearl.
 
 
The color of this firm material on the upper area is whitish-gray, and in the sunlight it would have the color of a pearl. Deeper down, however, it becomes darker and has the most beautiful colorations, almost like a gold and pearl oyster. This material is at the same time very heavy, which it has to be because of its location within the main inertia for the rotation of the Earth. In respect to its fine structure, the contemplation of the hone of the cranium of a common nut will show this in the most purposeful manner. Those indentations which appear on bones as visible pores are, in this part of the Earth, canals of several yards in thickness which are equipped with purposeful shutters that close at several points. In several places, various canals cross one another. Each canal carries a particular liquid to this point which mixes here and continues on. All canals are equipped with shutters that open upwards and close inwards.
 
 
These shutters ensure that the nourishing and restorative fluids eliminated by the organs do not return into these organs because of their heaviness, since every pulse beat of the large heart of the Earth drives the various fluids farther into the organs. When the fluids ascend in these organs, these shutters open because of the pressure from below, and the liquids flow in. When this pressure ceases, the liquids that have entered into these organs close these shutters and bar the liquids from returning. One large earth vein must, of course, have several of these shutters in its passage of thousands of miles. The large canals or veins also have great winding falls and several pressure pumps by which the pulse beat is supported. Similar shutters are also present in all the veins of animals.