THE EARTH

THE NATURAL EARTH

- Chapter 12 -
The kidneys of the Earth


 
I
n human and animal organisms the kidneys have a threefold purpose and are a tool of life worthy of attention. They have three essential and extremely important tasks. Without them, animalistic life could not exist, procreation would be unthinkable, and no living being could attain a cheerful, physical well being. A certain cheerfulness comes out of the kidneys. That is why this organ is especially and often mentioned in the Holy Scriptures.
 
 
It is the duty of the kidneys to receive what is excreted from the liver, and also the fluids which are not suitable for the organism. The useless part of these fluids is carried farther to the urinary bladder, while the one remaining part useful to life is absorbed and transformed into the actual material substance of the fertile semen. The semen is then, of course, taken up by the blood, and conducted into vessels entirely its own, where it is rendered suitable for procreation as positive polar energy through the negative energy of the testicles. This is the second task of the kidneys.
 
 
The third, even more important, task lies in the fact that the kidneys, through their very little and more concealed vessels, are in intimate contact with the heart, lungs, stomach, spleen, and liver. That is why, when viewed from a spiritual perspective, they serve the soul to a certain extent as a necessary field of activity during the time that the entity is procreating. That is why the kidneys produce, in natural life, a certain cheerful well-being, which cannot be attributed to the organ itself but to the soul and the active spirit within her.
 
 
Who cannot remember that, through long abstinence from sexual intercourse, he is seized by a permanent well-being? This feeling of joy is physically prepared in the kidneys, whose upholstered form provides a soft seat for the soul. This organ is responsible for physical happiness, so that the soul, following her activity in the heart and head, has a place of rest in the kidneys.
 
 
Somnambulism, and afterwards soul-consciousness, enters mostly into this organ, which is in intimate contact with the pit of the stomach through the ganglia of the nerves. The soul sees, hears, and feels through the solar plexus, and is thereby capable of communicating with the outer world.
 
 
The structure of the kidneys also has a significant resemblance to the spleen and liver, but is essentially different in the cushioned section. On each side of the kidneys there are certain belly-shaped sacks. These sacks are separated from each other by observable impressions and by a white cell tissue, and are connected as a whole only at the middle line, which also consists of a white cell tissue.
 
 
The main water canals course through this area, and deliver the noble seminal substance, which the kidneys absorb from the waters that come from the liver into the belly-shaped sacks. By means of the electricity produced in the belly-shaped sacks, this liquid matures more and is taken up as a subtle liquid by the delicate blood vessels of the kidneys. United with the blood, this seminal substance is passed into the heart, from which it enters I he chambers that are reserved for its storage through other vessels. Here the seminal substance receives continuous nourishment for its ultimate purpose from the testicles and thereby gains I he necessary capability for procreation.
 
 
The Earth's kidneys are located a little north of the equator. In their form they have a remarkable resemblance to the kidneys of a pig, and even more so to those of an elephant. They serve almost the same purpose in the Earth as they do in animals. They are the well out of which the ocean derives her water, and wherefrom all the waters on the surface of the Earth originate. The Earth has, of course, numerous urinary bladders, which may be found mostly between the Earth's skin and the interior firm earth as great water basins, some of which cover an area larger than Europe. First the oceans and then the other waters of the continents receive a constant supply of water from these large earthly bladders. This is the first duty of this organ of the Earth.
 
 
The second duty is the separation of the procreative water from the coarse urine of the Earth. The noble procreative water does not ascend immediately to the surface of the Earth as it does with animals, but is first returned to the heart of the Earth, and from there is brought through one of the canals to the Earth's surface. There it appears partially as sweet spring water and partially as the all-fructifying dew of the vegetable kingdom.